misscheriedior:

Naomi Campbell at Anna Sui Fall 1991

misscheriedior:

Naomi Campbell at Anna Sui Fall 1991

(Source: dinnerwithannawintour, via nigerianroyal)

Aw lil tyrese

Aw lil tyrese

(via nigerianroyal)

MORE SEX-WORKER/ESCORT BLOGS PLS

kokilax:

tequilar3d:

evolvingescort:

secretcallgirl:

lately my dashboard has been flooded with sugar blogs and well i’m a sex worker and so i need more likewise blogs to follow so i can benefit from more relatable posts and inputs pls

so please reblog if you’re a sex…

Yes I do, sorry my wording was terrible. I meant any other sex work besides sugaring because I already have so many

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police pick people out of the crowd, then rush forward. Frightening. 

September 28th

(via clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead)

thomasjay32:

frankethor:

zuky:

did-you-kno:

Source

The Scott sisters will remain on parole and be required to pay the state of Florida $52 per month for the rest of their lives.

I think it is important to also mention that they were released under the condition that one sister donate an organ to the other sister to save her life after neglect and abuse by the prison staff caused her health to deteriorate.
Also, it should be noted that the witnesses to the crime repeatedly said that the sisters were not the ones who robbed the restaurant.
If I remember correctly, the two women are relatives of an activist, or something to that effect and may have been targeted just because the cops couldn’t get to the family member. As far as I recall, neither women were themselves activist.

Bruh

thomasjay32:

frankethor:

zuky:

did-you-kno:

Source

The Scott sisters will remain on parole and be required to pay the state of Florida $52 per month for the rest of their lives.

I think it is important to also mention that they were released under the condition that one sister donate an organ to the other sister to save her life after neglect and abuse by the prison staff caused her health to deteriorate.

Also, it should be noted that the witnesses to the crime repeatedly said that the sisters were not the ones who robbed the restaurant.

If I remember correctly, the two women are relatives of an activist, or something to that effect and may have been targeted just because the cops couldn’t get to the family member. As far as I recall, neither women were themselves activist.

Bruh

(via clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead)

(Source: fuckyeahmarxismleninism, via clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead)

"It’s scary to think that there are words meant for me but were never said to me."

(via erikasmyname)

(Source: ohsatsune, via highhhhhlife)

saloandseverine:

Naomi as Diane, Pierre et Gilles, 1997

saloandseverine:

Naomi as Diane, Pierre et Gilles, 1997

(via lunalovesgood)

joetrohman:

Steal His Style: benedict cumberbatch

green alien suit (48.99)

(via lioness-feast)

"…[I]n the cases of Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum, as in the case of Daniel Holtzclaw and his alleged victims, the idea of sex work as an important factor in the crime continues to be obscured by other supposedly more important issues, watered down to nothing in order to be considered palatable to sensitive audiences. The few conversations I’ve seen on Twitter, Tumblr, and the occasional news articles and blogs focus only on the collective (non)reactions of people when a Black woman is the victim of violent crime. I do not want to take anything away from that analysis. I know it’s absolutely true: Black women are the least and the last in line for anger, rage, justice, pity, sympathy, and empathy…

…Black women are upset, we are incredibly sad, we are begging to be cared for, and we have a right to feel this way. We are completely correct in our steadfast refusal to simply disappear into the ether when we are violated, when our lives are snuffed out. We are justified in our anguish and in our anger. We are righteous in this, and I am not here to take away from it. I am here standing with my sisters and speaking out too. We are the most spotless of lambs, sinless in our desire to simply be seen as just as important as anyone else. But, what I am also here to say is this: in the midst of the tangible and thickening silence from what could arguably be called one of the most vocal corners of twitter, Black Feminist Twitter, and even Feminist Twitter as a whole; in the midst of the silence from virtually everyone and everywhere: where is the outrage for two teenage girls who were brutally murdered? Is the outrage lacking because of their race? Definitely. Is it non-existent because of their reported interactions with law enforcement? Absolutely. But it is also lacking because they were reported as working as exotic dancers. This cannot be denied. It is unfair and unethical to say anything different.

…We cannot, while decrying violence against Black women and confessing our desire to be seen, heard, and cared for; deny both the intersection of Black womanhood and sex work as a blind spot and the incredible violence Black sex workers face. There comes a point where we must be willing, if we are able, to speak out against the erasure and shame that is so often laid on Black women who also work in the sex trades. We must be willing to consistently speak out about the casual shaming and stigma that is so often attached to our existence.

In the midst of writings that throw away the reality of our lives by saying, “It is difficult to determine [why there is no outrage regarding Tjhisha and Angelia],” this task can seem overwhelming. It can be too much to, once again, find yourself erased, consciously ignored, and pushed aside. It can be more than you ever thought you’d be able to take, dealing with the violence levied on sex workers—Black women who are sex workers in particular—by media, bloggers, celebrities, and the public alike. Because it is violence, in a way. It is a violent choice to casually exact things like erasure, stigma, and shaming on people who are already erased, shamed, and stigmatized every day of their lives for something as mundane as simply going to work. It is a form of violence to yell out, “Pay attention to these girls,” while simultaneously harshly erasing them from the conversation. It is violence to use the deaths of Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum as a way to insert oneself into the forefront of a conversation while refusing to acknowledge the young women at all.

Because here is the truth: Ball and Mangum hadn’t reached their 20th birthdays. They came from poorer families. They obviously, judging only from the photos of them that have popped up online, enjoyed their lives–to some extent, at least. They were beautiful Black girls. They were beautiful young girls. They had entire worlds and lifetimes ahead of them. Tjhisha and Angelia were brutally murdered and still, over a week later, not many even know about it. Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum were important, lovely human beings who also worked as strippers.

Acknowledging their work and the violence many full service sex workers and exotic dancers face is not inappropriate. Realizing and admitting the facts is not untoward: Whatever labels we use, strippers; dancers; escorts; street workers; and many other sex workers are required to accept and deal with the high probability of being victimized both during and because of their work. This is life and they live with it every day. They must watch over their shoulders, carry weapons of self defense, and even create plan upon plan upon contingency plan just to arrive home safely at the end of a work day. Beyond that, many working in the sex trades, regardless of job description, must accept that this—the erasure that has happened to Tjhisha and Angelia—may also happen to them if they are the victims of violent crime. For Black women, that acceptance and the weight of it is doubly hard."

peechingtonmariejust in her magnificent  ”More Than Silence: Tjisha Ball, Angelia Mangum, and the Erasure of Black Sex Workers” on Tits and Sass today (via marginalutilite)

This is brilliant

nyamennwunamawu:

Never discredit your gut instinct. You’re not being paranoid. Your body can pick up vibrations, some better than others, and if something deep inside you says something’s not right about a person or situation, trust it and keep it pushing. 

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

beyonseh:

thezaynmalikdefensesquad:

canadians stop commenting on posts like you aint fuckin kill ya native population

brits stop commenting on posts like you aint colonize and enslave like 90% of the globe bc this shit is essentially your fault if you wanna be fuckin real

DRAG

Tiny ass Europe colonised a whole THIRD of the entire world

You have to be driven by an evil force to be able to ‘conquer’ that much, to such an extreme degree, in such a small period of time

Look at it this way - wherever you see white people as the main population, that’s not in Europe, they came from Europe, killed loads of people and ‘settled’ there… the US, Canada, South Africa, Australia, all of them

(Source: zanemalicks, via whitegirlsaintshit)

courtneylover:

babylikestopony:

New #somethingwicked luxury #leather styles in store at #babylikestopony. Hanah padded soft cup bra, thong & suspender belt. (at Babylikestopony)


Want

This is gorgeous and would look so good on me omg

courtneylover:

babylikestopony:

New #somethingwicked luxury #leather styles in store at #babylikestopony. Hanah padded soft cup bra, thong & suspender belt. (at Babylikestopony)

Want

This is gorgeous and would look so good on me omg

jamesfrancoselfie:

arjuna-vallabha:

Flooded ruins at Angkor

This looks like a Tomb Raider game

Take  me here

jamesfrancoselfie:

arjuna-vallabha:

Flooded ruins at Angkor

This looks like a Tomb Raider game

Take me here

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

elizabitchtaylor:

If the point of the Big Bang Theory was to show that male nerds can be just as sexist as male jocks then well done I guess

(via courtneylover)